My Azathioprine Adventures

azathioprine-falling-sick-and-always-tired-copyIt’s been a while since I threw myself down the Azathioprine rabbit hole, so perhaps it’s time for a quick recap of the ‘fall’ so far.

In a nutshell: finally got a prescription, acted like an ostrich, started meds, felt like shit, got used to meds, bloods went loopy, got taken off meds, 3 weeks of cold turkey, back on meds.  Makes my head spin just thinking about it.  Makes my head spin just thinking about it.

Follow my journey into a Lupus-filled sort of Wonderland:

 

Jeez, make up your mind already.

Today I received a letter that made my eyebrows shoot up and my hackles bristle. Three weeks after being told (via a nurse on my voicemail) to come off my Azathioprine, my rheumatologist now tells me (via a letter to my GP) that I didn’t actually need to stop them at all.  Please ‘start them up’ again, the letter said.SickandalwaystiredAzathioprine

Just like that, as if it’s as easy as popping Smarties.  Give me strength.  Every time I tell myself that those in charge of my health couldn’t cock it up anymore, they seem to find new ways to surpass themselves.

In the letter, there was no reference to the fact I shouldn’t even have been told to stop taking them; or that the nurses who told me to do so clearly didn’t get their instructions from him: the man in charge.  There was no acknowledgement that if my GP hadn’t bothered to write to him in the first place, he’d have been unaware I was even off the drug.  Rather alarming, that.

There were certainly no apologies for unnecessarily messing around with my treatment.  And of course, no thought of the fact that ‘starting up’ this drug is a horrible, painful process that takes many months of adjustment and makes you feel like a big pile of cold sick.  Or, that having to come off this drug for no apparent reason has resulted in another equally unpleasant and painful few weeks.

No, none of that.  Just a ‘please tell her to start it again’.  Now, what was I saying about needing that Empathy class again?

To make it all that little bit worse, it took them an age to even let me know.  For some unknown reason, it seems the hospital department can manage to pick up a phone and ring me when passing on the wrong message, yet when it comes to putting it right, that has to be done via snail mail.  And by second class, it would appear.

A whole bloody week it took them to dictate, type up and post that letter; then another three days till it landed on my doormat.  Where’s the logic in that?  A simple 30-second phone call would have gotten me back to where I needed to be an awful lot faster, and spared me that extra seven days of cold turkey blues.

So here we go again.  First I had to psych myself up for starting the Azathioprine, then I had to get used to feeling like death.  As soon as I was feeling better, I had to deal with coming off them again – and go back to feeling crap.  Now, I’m back at square one and preparing to start all over again.

Am I feeling amused?  In a word, no.

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An unwelcome visitor came to stay

sickandalwaystired.comcloudFor the last week, I have been living under a cloud.  A great big, heavy cloud that has hovered above my head and pressed down on me like tonne of bricks.

I’m not sure why this dark cloud descended on me one night, nor what started it or where it even came from.  How this unwelcome visitor snuck into the house and got past the dog, I have no clue; he normally barks at everything.

At the beginning of last week, I was feeling quite bright; the last of the azathioprine was loitering in my blood stream and I had some spare energy still knocking around. So to make the most of this ‘get up and go’, I did stuff.  I did a lot of stuff.  I did way too much stuff.  And then I paid the price.

By Thursday I was flagging, by Friday it was all too late.  Engines off, power down, body into battery saving sleep mode.  My ‘get up and go’ had got up and gone. Bugger it, why me and it’s not fair – I hate Lupus.

That day and the three that followed could most definitely be classed as inside the house days. I didn’t really move more than I had to, just a slow scuffy shuffle from room to room. I couldn’t be bothered to do anything, think anything or feel anything.  I didn’t want to read, write, rest, eat or brush my hair.  Worse still, I didn’t want to talk, laugh or even smile.  I’d completely lost my happy.

Sure I’ve had slumps before, but none like this.  My mood was as flat as a Dover sole.  But why?  Everything in my life (health aside) was great, yet I felt utterly miserable, desolate even.  I also felt strangely detached from everything and everyone around me, and I didn’t know how to reconnect.  Worse than that, I couldn’t summon up the energy to even try to reconnect.

Thank God for my husband, the one who knows me so well.  He watched, waited and persevered.  He tried every trick in the book to chip away and dig me out from my pit of misery and gloom.  It took a painstaking line of questioning, several pick axes, a crowbar and a box of tissues.  Oh, and a box of my favourite Lindor chocolates.

Two days on and I’m still not sure what that was all about.  Perhaps it all stemmed from my frustration and despondency over the great medication fiasco.  Or perhaps my brain was short wiring from months and months of erratic sleep.  Or maybe my body was simply objecting to going cold turkey after months on the drugs.

Whatever the reason, I’m hoping that wretched cloud stays well away and doesn’t invade my home or head space again.

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The two faces of Lupus

These days there are definitely two versions of me: the ‘inside the front door’ me and the ‘facing the world’ me.  Same species, same person, same DNA, but oh my, you wouldn’t believe how different I can look.

My ‘inside look’ is quite a sight to behold: yellow/grey/green tinged skin; hooded, burning panda eyes; well past needing a wash hair, dragged up into a top-knot; a chicken legged hobble when I walk.  And then there’s the uniform of the chronically ill: the baggy t-shirt, hoodie, all-day pajamas, tracksuit bottoms, leggings combo. Plus fluffy socks and slippers, obviously.  Wearing a bra very much comes down to the mood on the day and how much extra effort will be required.

Very few people are unlucky enough to be subjected to this terrifying, unfiltered version of me.  My husband and kids take the brunt of it, and they’re so used to it now that, god love ’em, they don’t even flinch.  The postman is also subjected, but I do tend to hide behind the dog when opening the door.www.sickandalwaystired.com

On the odd occasion, this ‘inside look’ has actually made it past the end of the drive, but I do try to limit this to the ‘beyond too tired to give a shit’ days.  Normally these outings involve the school run when I scuttle into the car wearing completely inappropriate night-time clothing and large dark glasses.  My poor daughter only has to spot me from across the car park, slinking down behind the wheel, to know what sort of day it’s been.

These momentary blips aside, when I head out with a chance of meeting people I will always make an effort to spruce up.  If for no other reason than when you look like death, people have to pretend they haven’t noticed, and it all becomes a bit awkward.

My ‘outside the house’ look is a throwback to the pre-Lupus days.  Preparation for this is like an episode of DIY SOS, sponsored by Batiste dry shampoo and the entire Bare Minerals range.  First up is the need to change into items of clothing that aren’t shaped like a bin bag and made entirely out of misshapen cotton, lycra or fleece.

Then there’s the makeup.  Thank god for the makeup.  It can take a skin tone from exhausted, jaundice chic to healthy, sun-kissed glow in a matter of minutes.  The trick, I have learnt, is not taking the transformation too far.  Like I did a month or so ago when my husband felt the need to point out I was looking a little too ‘just back from a holiday’ for the middle of an English winter.  Hair straighteners are a must, obviously.  Finally, remove slippers, add shoes and ‘ta daaaaaa’.  From half dead to healthy looking in a jiffy.

But here’s the bugger.  The moment you make an effort to look like a healthier version of yourself, people think you’re cured.  Or worse still, they think you were never really that sick in the first place.

You’re looking greatare you feeling better then?” they ask.  Now there’s a tricky one to answer.  Your illness is not their problem and of course they mean well, but…

No, definitely still sick, just caked in makeup, rattling with pills and forcing a smile,” would be the honest reply.  But who wants to hear that, it’s a guaranteed conservation killer.

I’ve found it’s best to just keep it simple and lie.  “I’m fine.” usually does the trick.

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